Dronechoir? like the flying things? No:


As director, composer, curator and performer, my aim for Dronechoir is to present beautiful musical experiences that provide deeper connections between women of different cultures within our musical community.

Dronechoir performances require a group of no fewer than four female vocalists of various ethnic backgrounds and musical interests who perform an unrehearsed 30-minute piece that I’ve composed. Each singer is given musical and movement cues through earphones.

Although the current composition of the piece, entitled TRACE, is a constant, Dronechoir continuously reshapes itself through the participation of generous, adventurous vocalists of diverse backgrounds whose voices vary in volume, range and timbre — which is where the movement directions come into play, physically foregrounding specific singers at different points in the piece. As a result, the singers may move closer to members of the audience than expected, bringing depth to the listener’s experience by challenging comfort barriers and introducing a heightened sense of engagement with the performance.

But discomfort is a factor for the performers as well: Dronechoir combines unfamiliar collaborators with an unrehearsed performance, and everyone is singing together for the first time with people they may never have met before. We are given the opportunity to become comfortable with our discomfort, settling into the unknown. Throughout the piece, the vocalists learn what their role is within the choir and composition. By committing to this unrehearsed performance the vocalists naturally demonstrate a sense of hope and support, acceptance with what is in the moment, love and respect to our audiences and each other.

video of Arone Dyer’s Dronechoir TRACE taken at Michelberger’s Nameless, Endless Festival in Berlin on October 1st, 2016.